The Best Mountaineering Boots – Money Can Buy

The Best Mountaineering Boots

Enjoying the mountain’s true natural side is never as close and immense as when you’re hiking and mountaineering. This extreme sport involves climbing, hiking, sliding, and all the techniques you can think of in order to conquer the mountain.
Imagine yourself trying to conquer something like Everest – the ultimate peak of the ultimate mountain – the Himalayas. You wouldn’t make it without superb, solid foundation – the best mountaineering boots.

That’s what I’m here with you today; to help you explore better and stay safe with the best possible support and quality below your feet.
Check my buying guide out!

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​5 Best La Sportiva Mountaineering Boots Reviews

Here’s my list of which products you can take into consideration when shopping. Each is perfect for the individual situation, so depending on which do you need, you can make a choice.

**Below, you'll find our more detailed reviews, but you can also click the links above to see current prices or read customer reviews on Amazon.

1. Editors pick - La Sportiva Makalu Mountaineering Boot


The first thing you will notice about this boot is its height. They are deep and will cover and support your ankle properly, so the worrying about twists and bumps is off the table. Still, the ankle-wrapping part is made of soft leather, which will not scratch your foot, nor cause discomfort when climbing. When paired with excellent lacing, it turns out that this is one reliable and comfortable boot.
The upper part of the boot is made of Idro-Perwanger Leather, which is highly durable and can sustain a lot of wear and tear. Also, I was afraid that this part would be prone to moist and rain, but the manufacturer did an excellent job, so there were no water leaks, and my feet remained perfectly dry.

As for the thread, I feel that these notched crampons are increasing the stability, and although the rubber is a tad softer, it is nothing catastrophic. In fact, I have felt that it added up to comfort. It is also lightweight because I have not experienced that tiring weight while on long walks.
The matter of price is also nicely done, and they are a worthy purchase.


Things I Liked

  • thumbs-o-up
    Light
  • thumbs-o-up
    Water resistant
  • thumbs-o-up
    Superb fitting
  • thumbs-o-up
    Excellent lacing
  • thumbs-o-up
    Stable

Things I Didn't Like

  • thumbs-o-down
    They tend to be small, so ordering half or number higher is advised


The second place earned by these boots was somewhat natural. Triolet Pro GTX mountaineering boots are nice, but not superb. Made with orange leather and textile combination, these boots are waterproof and tightly sealed.
The tread sports triangular crampons, which are improving stability and traction. The rubber is comfortable, although I have felt that the heel could be a touch lower and wider. Shock absorbing feature is a pleasant surprise, mostly because this option was available only for running shoes.

The lacing is decent, but I had a bit of trouble with the upper locking rings should be a bit longer, because it happened a couple of times that the lace falls off.
The price also remains in the range of reasonable, and it is entirely appropriate for this model of boot.


Things I Liked

  • thumbs-o-up
    Waterproof
  • thumbs-o-up
    Comfortable
  • thumbs-o-up
    Reasonable price

Things I Didn't Like

  • thumbs-o-down
    The heel is a bit higher than it should be
  • thumbs-o-down
    Upper locking rings should be better


Such flashy and pompous boots had to be on my list, and while remaining a good boot, it wasn’t enough for the first two places. The first thing noticeable about these boots besides color is its material. It is entirely made of textile, and while this is perfect for warm weather because the skin can breathe, I have experienced wet feet while it was raining. Nothing drastic, but there were some leaks.
The crampons and the lacing are superbly done, so the boot will not slip or twist, even when undertaking rougher terrain. What bothered me the most is the thread of this boot. I had felt that it is too narrow, and my foot couldn’t get enough traction and support. Also, they sometimes feel a bit “wobbly.”

The price is ideal for this boot, it is low, and you can freely consider this boot if you are a beginner in mountaineering, or you are going for hikes occasionally. Still, these are among the cheapest boots, so if you are tight on budget, this will be a right choice for you.


Things I Liked

  • thumbs-o-up
    Light
  • thumbs-o-up
    Lacing is good
  • thumbs-o-up
    Crampons are nicely distributed
  • thumbs-o-up
    Breathable
  • thumbs-o-up
    Cheap

Things I Didn't Like

  • thumbs-o-down
    Narrow thread
  • thumbs-o-down
    Can leak


In case that you need an upgrade to something more fitting for a professional, these boots will be perfect for you. The price may seem outrageous, but keep in mind that this is top shelf, crème de la crème.
What is most noticeable about this boot is its lacing system. Sporting BOA mechanics, there are no laces or dangling knots, only two wheels which are used for fine tuning of tightening. The main advantage of this approach is that you can so finely adjust the grip that the boot will fit perfectly. Over the whole boot, there is a sealing mechanism which keeps the water out.

The thread may be narrow, but it is stable and provides an excellent grip. Additional crampons can be outfitted with these boots, and any standard-sized ones will do the trick. What surprised me the most is the choice of the material. The manufacturer opted to include even aluminum, which shows how serious they are.
As for the price, it is very high for an average shopper, but in case that you wish to invest in your hobby for the next ten years, this is the perfect choice for you.


Things I Liked

  • thumbs-o-up
    Lightweight
  • thumbs-o-up
    Durable
  • thumbs-o-up
    Waterproof
  • thumbs-o-up
    BOA mechanics

Things I Didn't Like

  • thumbs-o-down
    Very expensive


In case that you love to walk up from the tree line, you will need proper boots. Not any kind of boot is fit for this, so this is my recommendation.
The most noticeable feature is its ankle support. While your ankle remains locked in place, it is still able to move, because of the 3D flex element which is used in this model. Although the boot is made of synthetic materials, it is comfortable, lightweight and waterproof. The snow is not the problem, even if it remains and melts on the surface of the boot.

The thread is decently made, narrow so the usage of crampons is eased. The crampons are standard ones, which only accents the intention of the manufacturer to be used with a set of crampons.
The price is reasonable, so it will not be too much to pay for a pair of those, in case that you need them.


Things I Liked

  • thumbs-o-up
    Waterproof
  • thumbs-o-up
    Snow proof
  • thumbs-o-up
    Lightweight
  • thumbs-o-up
    Great ankle support

Things I Didn't Like

  • thumbs-o-down
    Warm to be worn in warm weather

How To Choose The Best Mountaineering Boots?

01

With the high amount of commercials and marketing which is targeting specific groups, it is sometimes hard to determine whether or not to make a purchase. Therefore, the only reasonable way to undergo is to take several products and compare them. There are key features which every product must fulfill, and that way I have chosen the winner.

The material

For a long time, the leather was the synonym for quality and reliability. Today it is considered as the most natural but also the most expensive material to make boots of. Luckily, modern science had developed several artificial materials which can replace the leather even better, with polyester being the most often used. The material of which the boots are made should be resistant to tearing and waterproof, and in the same time, it needs to let the skin breathe so that the feet will stay dry.

The Lacing

The upper part of the boot is the most common place for manufacturers to put lacing on. Without any doubt, this traditional approach is far the best. Avoiding those with sideway lacing is best advised because there is the less balanced distribution of tension. Of course, lacing holes should be distributed equally, so the pressure is dispersed in the same manner. Those with “deeper” lacing (that which goes lower along the foot) are even better. In that case, you can control it the whole length.
02

The Tread Surface

Since mountaineering is not something easy as walking through the park, the tread surface should be appropriate. Think of it as tires of a car. For casual, daily driving any crampons are good. But, if you are driving the rally, special ones are needed, which will not slip in the mud or snow.

Still, the thread must not be nor too rigid nor too soft. The first one will not give you excellent traction, while the other may lead to injuries or uncomfortable walking. If the tread is too thin, you will “feel” every stone you step on, and in case that it is too thick, there are high chances that it will be unstable.

The Price

The matter of money spend on boots are completely up to you, although there are some general rules of thumb you should follow. Personally, I’m not spending a fortune on hiking shoes, but on the other hand, I’m not too shy to splash the cash if I think that the boots are worth the money. The best course of action is to find a good brand and model, see if there is your size available, and then find the best deal available.

Online shopping is the newest way of purchasing things, and probably the best, because of the huge competition which influences the prices, making them cheap.

The Size

All other things may seem important, but nothing matters more than the way how the boot fits you. It mustn’t be big because that extra space is a liability so that you may trip over. On the other hand, if it is too small, your circulation will be slowed, which results in colder feet and the appearance of blisters or even open wounds, which is the worst case scenario in the wilderness to have.

To determine which size you need, measure your foot, and compare with the measurements provided by the manufacturer. I have learned that measuring your foot is more precise than measuring by the number. Simply put, different manufacturers have different molds for making boots, and hence the difference.

The conclusion

03

The best boots on this list are La Sportiva Makalu Mountaineering Boot. They have beaten the competition with their price and quality ratio, and by being among the most resistant ones while remaining comfortable and reliable. The overall impression is that the manufacturer had done a great job with these boots, so in case that you are mountaineering more than once in three months, this is an investment which will pay off.

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